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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
contracts? if they agree what business is a the government to interfere? >> the also go14 year-old son of the cold wind. there has to be appointed. >> this is the 21st century. john: if you volunteer is that freedom? >> i grabbed as a liberal in the '60s now i am a libertarian democrats these to be press seetary because i in understand the argument how we exploit workers of the world that they need to have th backing of the goverent demand john pay his interns but these people are not so stupid they cannot decide if they are exploited. it is a contract that is understood. >> no coercive power is used it as a libertarian stream -- dream. john: the obama labor department can now with the explicit rules if you don't pay them there is criteria. the employer derives no immediate vantage. [laughter] on occasion the operations must be impeded? i had in turn to impede did my work i tried to get rid of them. >> if fox wanted you to do a news show and said do it underpaid and then we throw use and academic credit then we will decide. would you except that? john: maybe not at this point* in my ca
to ask? my deposits are about to get snatched by the government, and, you know, that's a real problem. you're going to see it spread. sandra: spencer, you can't run and hide. if you're an investor, you have to be in the market. how do you hedge risk? >> get real assets, look at commodities. oil did well. you saw the grains do well. they were up in a down market. you saw gold basically be flat. get in real commodities and get out of stocks because stocks are at all time highs. there's no reason p why you should buy now. sandra: peter, you are a bear with the u.s. dollar. it was the euro that took it hard today. >> yeah, you know, the euro was down, but back to the stock market, the stock market doesn't go up every day. just because it went down today, it's not a big selloff in reaction to the news. i mean, you are going to get down days. i think the market should have gone down more than it did because of the problems, but i think all the money printing is what's going to keep nominal stock prices rising. no one way or the other, you lose value of the deposits because if the bank doesn
: right now to the top story. efforts here at home to make sure our government is never able to raise the private savings of private retirement accounts of americans. saying congress shouldn't even consider any kind of tax or sees sure of deposits. if approved it could give everyone in the country a bit of relief. basically insuring what is being proposed in cyprus really can not happen here. joining me with details is the cosponsor of the resolution, republican congressman tom coal from oklahoma. congressman, thanks for coming on the show. >> thank you. melissa: do we really need a resolution to protect us from this? is there a danger this would happen, do you think? >> people in cyprus probably thought the same thing a couple days before it happened. do we really need to worry about this? i think we ought to make sure. and look, i don't think it would happen, i will be honest with you. i think, most of our regulators understand how counter productive this is, how it will destroy confidence. it will give people not to put money in safe places like banks. but we ought to reassure peop
a solidarity fund that would pool state assets and give government powers to impose capital controls on banks. the european central banks says cyprus has until monday to raise $7.5 billion or risk financial collapse. banks there have been closed all week and hundreds of demonstrators gathering outside of parliament protesting. it is coming down to the wire. what will this do to the markets. what should you do with your portfolio? with me now is our money power panel. senior fellow at peterson institute. lance roberts, ceo and chief economist with street advisors. pleasure having you there. we're trying to get our third guest all strapped up. i think that was spencer patton. we'll see if we have him in a bit. jacob, let me start wit you. what do you thk of these latest developments? >> well, i think they're fairly prectable actually. it is very clear that the european central bank has given cyprus an ultimatum. it basically put as gun to your head. unless you come up with a deal that qualifies you for an international financial bailout by monday we're going to blow up your banks. unsurprisingl
the government in cyprus is make being the situation there even worse, contributing to the chaos and virtually guaranteeing a bank run. the government says that cypriot banks wot open until nex tuesday! meantime, atm withdrawals are being limited to 500 bucks with no bailout in sight, is there any solution to keep calm and carry on? that is e first question for today's money power panel. we have a former consultant to the imf and the u.s. treasury department. julia is a chief economist at pnb paribas and former economist for the u.s. federal reserve board. and the always wonderful steve moore. you recognize him from "the wall street journal." that is him on the right there. john, let me start with you. >> yes. melissa: seems like they're making a situation that could have been resolved because of course they're not taking the 10% levy on deposits but keeping banks closed. people are beginning to panic. they're almost guaranteeing a run on the bank. are they making the situation worse? >> not politically. if tomorrow you wake up and you find there is a 10% tax on your bank deposits, you will no
use it but there is a new plan to cap it and generate piles of revenue for the government. it could pull a rag out from under the marketnd the homeowners. the latest details you cannot afford to miss. even when they say it is not, it is all about "money." ♪ melissa: all right, first to today's market moment. the raid on deposits sending chills down the spines. the market phone for the second session in a row. the first back-to-back losses nearly a month in case you're keeping track. investors gear may be best reflected in the vix. our top story, the critical situation in cyprus threatening to set off a chain reaction around the world. the european nation wants to tax all bank deposits up to 10% in order to secure a $13 billion bailout for the government. this move is unprecedented, it would basically allow the government to skim the bank accounts of every single person who makes a deposit into a cyprus bank account. if that is not enoug the country has closed all banks until thursday so if the decision is made there will not be anything anybody can do if they have money in the ban
. microsoft and some of its business partners are being investigated over a foreign bribery claims. government officials in china, italy and romania were allegedly bribed to earn software contracts but shares of microsoft still managed to close the day up slightly. >>> all right we start tonight in cyprus. th parliament rejected the tax on bank deposits, potentially killing the bailout but russia is floating another option, gazprom, which is russia's state-owned oil company, is reportedly offering exploration rights to the island's rich natural gas fields. here to break it down the former im fsec tiff board member and current visiting fellow at the peterson institute for international economics. doug, welcome to the show. >> thanks. melissa: is there a danger to letting russia really get its hooks in cyprus ke that? should we be worried about that? >> absolutely. i mean russia already has its hooks, as you put it, in cyprus because the cypriot economy is largely based, if not almostexclusively based on its status as an offshore banking haven and that has been largely at the behest of russian m
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)